Goosemire Cottages Blog

How many Lakes are there in the Lake District?

Date: 24th April 2012
Filed under: Top Tips
Tagged: bassenthwaite, coniston, grasmere, haweswater, lake district lakes, ullswater, windermere

How many lakes are there in the Lake District? it is actually a trick question. Most people will answer 16 but infact there is only one real lake which is:

Bassenthwaite - 4 miles long, 3/4 mile wide and only 70ft deep. The most northerly of all the lakes and very popular with sailing boats. Also the lake has a very rare breed of fish called Vendace which are only found here and in Derwentwater. Lakeside Lodge is only a stones throw from the lakeshore.

The other fifteen are actually “meres” and “waters” often mistaken as Lakes. These are:

Buttermere - 1 1/2 miles long, 3/4 mile wide and 75ft deep. Many say it offers some of the best walking in the whole of Lakeland. Well known walks include the summits of Haystacks and Red Pike. The famous walker Alfred Wainright asked for his ashes to be scattered at Haystacks as it was his favorite place to walk.

Buttermere
Buttermere

Coniston Water - 5 miles long and at its deepest point 184 ft. Made famous by Malcolm and Donald Campbell.  In 1939 Sir Malcolm Campbell set the waterspeed record at 141 miles per hour. His son Donald aimed to better 300 miles per hour which he did in 1967. However his craft “Bluebird” shot up into the air then sank into the lake. His body wasnt recovered until 2001. Coniston Water is also where the book Swallows and Amazons is based, and was written by Arthur Ransome. Tsukudu is within a short drive of Coniston.

Coniston
Coniston

Crummock Water - 2 1/2 miles long, 3/4 mile wide and 140 ft deep. Crummock Water has breathtaking views with Mellbreak fells on the east side and Grassmoor on the West.

Crummock Water
Crummock Water

Derwentwater - 3 miles long, 1 mile wide and 72 ft deep. Keswick is at the northern end of the lake, and at the Southern end the valley of Borrowdale. Plenty of activities on the lake including motor boats and lake cruises.

Derwentwater
Derwentwater

Elterwater - 1/2 mile long and approx 46ft deep. Situated in the Great Langdale Valley a area popular with walkers and cyclists. During the winter months Whooper swans from Siberia and Scandinavia migrate here.

Elterwater
Elterwater

Ennerdale Water - 2 1/2 miles long, 1 mile wide and 148 ft deep. This is the only Lake not to have a road running along side the shore line. As it is very remote and Westerly it doesnt get a huge number of visitors.

Ennerdale Water
Ennerdale Water

Esthwaite - Although small it is well known by fishermen as it is a well kept trout fishery and regulary stocked throughout the main season. The lake also offers Winter Pike fishing and general coarse fishing. 

Esthwaite Water
Esthwaite

Grasmere - 1 mile long, 1/2 mile wide and 75 ft deep. One of the better known lakes due to its connections with William Wordsworth. He famously described this area as ‘The most loveliest spot than man hath found’. During the main season boats can be hired. Helm Crag has a fantastic view of the lake from the large picture window in the lounge and also from the grounds.

Grasmere
Grasmere

Haweswater (Reservoir)- 4 miles long, 1/2 mile wide and at its maximum 200 ft deep. Originally two stretches of  water known as High Water and Low Water. In 1929 The Manchester Corperation built a dam raising the water level by 95ft to create a reservoir. Teal Cottage is only a short drive from Haweswater.

Haweswater
Haweswater

Loweswater - 1 mile long, 1/2 mile wide and 60ft deep. Often overlooked and home to Red Squirrels. The group of fells to the south of the lake are known as the Loweswater Fells and are made up of Mellbreak, Blake Fell, Gavel Fell, Hen Comb and Burnbank.

Loweswater
Loweswater

Rydal Water - 3/4 mile long, 1/4 mile wide and 60ft deep. Very popular with walkers partly because of its connections with William Wordsworth. The walks takes in Rydal Cave, and also Rydal Mount and Dove Cottage which were home to Wordsworth.

Rydal Water
Rydal Water

Thirlmere - 3 1/2 miles long, 1 1/4 miles wide, 158 ft deep. Thirlmere was originally two smaller lakes but in 1889 Manchester Corporation Waterworks built a dam making it into one large reservoir.

Thirlmere
Thirlmere

Ullswater - 7 1/2 miles long, 3/4 mile wide and a maximum depth of 205 ft. Although it is the second largest lake in the lake district it doesnt seem to attract the same masses of visitors Windermere does. Ullswater is traditionally the quieter side of the lakes and far more popular with walkers. Popular for sailing and also Ullswater Steamers. Beauthorn Cottage and Beauthorn Coach House are on the lakeshore of Ullswater at Watermillock. 

Ullswater
Ullswater

Wastwater - 3 miles long, 1/2 mile wide and 260 ft deep. It is surrounded by Red Pike, Kirk Fell, Great Gable and Scafell Pike, which is the highest mountain in England. As it is the deepest of the lakes it is very popular with divers.

Wastwater
Wastwater

Windermere - 10.5 miles long, 1 mile wide and 220ft deep. It is the largest natural “lake” in England and a mecca for tourists, with Bowness on Windermere being the Lake District’s most popular holiday resort. Popular for watersports, rowing boat hire and steamer cruises either to Fell Foot or Waterhead near Ambleside. Lake View is a two bedroomed apartment in the centre of Bowness with views of the lake from the lounge window.

Windermere
Windermere